adventures in nature

Posts tagged “canon

20161025 juv owls and venus


juvenile great horned owls and venus in background at sunset / contra costa county CA


2016 Sept 20 – butters n blues

a74a4702-v1California Sister * Adelpha californica

Briones Regional Park * Contra Costa County CA



juvenile Western Bluebirds * Sialia mexicana

These four flew into the tree above me and huddled together in the shade, taking refuge from the hot afternoon sun together. It was pretty adorable.

2016 June Richmond Osprey Nest

A fellow raptor-lover / naturalist friend of mine lives on a boat by Point Richmond, and this winter she convinced the harbor master to install a platform on the breakwater in hopes that osprey would nest there. They did! Osprey have been continuing to be present in increasing numbers here in the Bay Area, and I was able to get to see the nest last week, just a week after the two babies hatched. It was difficult to see them because they are still so small, but I hope to return to see them in a couple of weeks when they are more visible.

Right when I got there, dad (named Lee) had just caught a nice sized striped bass and was looking for a place to start eating. The fish looks like it is saying “oooooooohhhhhhh shit.” Valid.

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My friend said that he typically has been the one hunting, and the female sits on the nest with the young since they hatched. Evidently he seems to always get this size and type of fish, and there were reports about a year ago of a surge in the density of striped bass in the Bay. He usually finds a spot to eat the head, before he delivers it to the nest. Today though, he left a nearby perch possibly due to the high winds and he went right over the nest. But not before the gulls harrassed him for his dinner.

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The gulls are always looking for an easy meal, and two great-blue herons that were on the breakwater were not pleased …

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A double-crested cormorant popped up right by us on the dock, beautiful creatures.

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Pops decided to re-locate after mom (Eileen) had fed herself and the tiny little hatchlings. He went on a perch just to the side of the nest to keep working on dinner, as the sky turned to pink and purple with the setting sun.

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Special thanks to Shirley for all the work she does and her love for these birds.






Klamath Basin report VI – Butte Valley Finale

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Cowboy boots ‘n mountain buttes
Pick-up trucks ‘n luckless ducks
Hungry hawks ‘n too-thin socks
Saw eagle with coyote, like I was on peyote
So comes to a close, my trip to the Klamath Basin

Ha!! Ah jeez. Not my best work there.

Regardless, some of the best action on my trip was saved for last. As I left the area, I stopped off in an spot that was reported to have large numbers of ferruginous hawks, a species that I had seen scant sign of in the Klamath Basin just to the north.

Initially I wasn’t seeing any raptors at all as I drove along some of the roads in the snowy flat lands that consisted primarily of ag fields or open, high desert ecosystems. Thee wild areas featured primarily rabbit brush and desert sage, with the occasional juniper tree. There were jack rabbit and coyote tracks all over the place.


Butte Valley CA


Butte Valley CA

I was shocked that there didn’t seem to be ANY raptors around an area that seemed like it would be full of prey. The reason? They were all in one spot. Literally. When I finally found the raptor swarm, there must have been over 100 birds of prey in the 360 degree view around me – and two coyotes! They were in a number of adjacent ag fields that hadn’t been plowed. The mice/vole/ground squirrels populations there must be outrageous. Everyone was there for lunch!

There was a line of telephone poles along the country road, and on almost every other pole there was at least one raptor – but sometimes as many as five on one pole! And sometimes multiple species! I had never seen anything like this.

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Five! raptors on one telephone pole – (from left): 2 juvenile red-tailed hawks, 1 juvenile ferruginous hawk, one adult red-tailed hawk, and one dark morph ferruginous hawk) / Butte Valley CA

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same crew as the above picture, but with an adult ferruginous hawk doing a fly-by! / Butte Valley CA

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immature bald eagle on the front pole, and raptors on almost every pole thereafter down the road / Butte Valley CA

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and more …

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“If I ignore him maybe he won’t see me …” – juvenile FEHA (ferruginous hawk) on left, juvenile RTHA (red-tailed hawk) on right / Butte Valley CA

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“Wait, does he know I’m here?”

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“Well hello there” (juv RTHA on left, juv FEHA on right)

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immature bald eagle (Basic I?) with juvenile RTHA / Butte Valley CA

There was an irrigation wheel line with eight segments on it, and I counted 19 raptors on it (including bald eagles, ferruginous hawks, rough-legged hawks, and red-tails)! In the immediate area were a lot of red-tailed hawks mostly perched on something, and all over the ground in the fields there were ferruginous hawks everywhere (probably 50+ of that species alone)!! There were also a good number of Northern harriers, bald eagles, rough-legged hawks, and at least one golden eagle. Plus the two coyotes. It was unbelievable.

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dark morph FEHA / Butte Valley CA

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dark morph FEHA / Butte Valley CA

What an incredible finale to my trip. It often happens that way – as if the Spirits of the Land are trying to get me to stay. I will certainly be back there soon.

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red-tailed hawk on juniper / Butte Valley CA

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red-tailed hawk on doug fir (?) / Butte Valley CA

Thank you Klamath Basin!

Links to more information on Klamath Basin:

KS Wild

Winter Wings Festival – being held this Feb 11-14th 2016!

Klamath Audobon

Klamath Birding

Klamath Basin National Wildlife Complex

Klamath Basin report V – immature bald eagles

No, they weren’t misbehaving.

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immature bald eagle (Basic I plumage – aka on its second year of life, likely approaching its 2nd birthday)

Bald eagles take five years before they grow their adult plumage, and in the early years many people can mistake them for golden eagles since they don’t acquire the characteristic white head and tail until adulthood.

One bird was perched on a branch very close to the road, and we spent a long period of time together at a very close distance. The bird preened and seemed relaxed (which let me know I wasn’t too close, something I’m always ultra-sensitive to – I try to always be far enough away that the wildlife feels comfortable and not threatened). This bird appears to be a young bird in its second year of life (now approaching its second birthday) – wearing what is referred to as a Basic I plumage (1st year, or hatch year is called a “juvenile,” second year is Basic I, then Basic II, Basic III and adult). The feather pattern for each year are variable but generally unique, combined with beak and eye coloring, and help to distinguish the age.

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immature bald eagle (Basic I plumage) / Lower Klamath NWR

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immature bald eagle (Basic I plumage) / Lower Klamath NWR

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Nearby was another young bird, and this one had plumage that was different than the first – indicative of Basic II plumage (a bird in its third year of life).

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immature bald eagle (Basic II plumage – a bird in its third year of life) – Lower Klamath NWR

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immature bald eagle (Basic II plumage) – Lower Klamath NWR

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immature bald eagle (Basic II plumage) / Lower Klamath NWR

Along this same part of the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge, there was a solitary treeline that had almost 15 bald eagles in it – along with many red-tailed hawks and one golden eagle. A ranger I spoke to said that two weeks prior, he counted over 60 bald eagles (and a golden eagle) in the immediate area of the treeline! The density of birds makes it such that species that usually don’t tolerate each other in close proximity end up roosting right next to each other, as did many bald eagles and red-tails that I witnessed over the two days (though occasionally a red-tail would go after an eagle, just to remind it who was in charge).

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adult bald eagle perched next to a red-tailed hawk / Lower Klamath NWR

Being in an area like this really allows for a deep study into field identification of birds because there are so many species in the area.

A great time of year to visit is in February during the Winter Wings Festival – events are planned over a long weekend catering to raptor viewing, including guided trips in the Basin, education programs, vendor displays (optics mostly), and more. This year it takes place the weekend of February 11-14, 2016.

Klamath Basin report III- northern harrier gets some supper

As mentioned in my last blog post, while I watched an otter consume a duck, a northern harrier came gliding down the canal and dropped down on a small bird in the vegetation on the side of the canal just 10 feet from the otter!

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northern harrier starts its attack!

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first strike! northern harrier grabs the small bird

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harrier attempts to subdue small bird now in its talons

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the struggle continues

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lift-off!       lift-off?

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not quite – the struggle continues down on the ice

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the harrier wins this contest

The whole time I’m shooting this scene the otter is just eating (and occasionally napping) away just 10 feet to the right. It was just ridiculous the amount of activity happening at this particular location.

One thing I noted while driving was that small birds were flying very close in front of my vehicle. I actually struck one of them, sadly. I’m wondering if their reaction time is slowed by the cold weather and if that gives an advantage to predators (who are primarily using gravity to drop down on their prey). Interesting to hear if anyone else has experience with this.


Albany mudflats opsrey – a Canon lens comparison

I was spoiled the other day while observing peregrine falcons (besides the fact that I was observing peregrine falcons!) – a fellow East Bay photographer, George Suennen, let me borrow his “more advanced” (aka more expensive) lens setup for a couple of shots (Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM Telephoto Lens with a 2x teleconverter). I REALLY REALLY don’t want to like this piece of equipment, but … WOW. Very gracious of him to offer for me to use it, I’m not sure if I thank him or curse him for putting that thing in my hands!!

oprey / Albany mudflats CA

oprey / Albany mudflats CA

Right now I typically shoot with a different Canon 300mm lens – the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM (but I DON’T have a 2x teleconverter attached – which brings the L-series lens setup to an equivalent of 600mm!). To understand the difference in lenses, a visual comparison is in order of course. Both images below are cropped close to 100% but no other post-processing has been applied (sharpening, contrast/brightness adjustment, etc). The same camera body was used. The difference between the lens setups is very evident.

Canon 70-300mm zoom lens

Canon 70-300mm zoom lens

Canon L-series 300mm fixed lens w/ 2x teleconverter

Canon L-series 300mm fixed lens w/ 2x teleconverter

Are the results worth 14x the amount of money more? I suppose that’s an individual choice. It’s certainly understandable why this lens is rated one of the best in the Canon lineup, and a standard for many sports and wildlife photographers. Until I make the jump, I’ll have to continue to get close to subjects without disturbing them to get clear shots … which is a large part of the fun – and helps to force me to really get the most out of my equipment and techniques.