adventures in nature

Posts tagged “osprey

20160629 osprey

A74A3741 v1osprey with de-brained striped bass / Richmond, CA

Because it’s just rude to give your mate a fish with it’s brains still intact. Or is that like eating a slice of pizza from the box on the way home from your favortite spot that you just got take-out from? Or perhaps is this a zombie osprey? Inspiration for a new spin-off from the Walking Dead – The Flying Dead (Osprey)?

Time will tell.


2016 June Richmond Osprey Nest

A fellow raptor-lover / naturalist friend of mine lives on a boat by Point Richmond, and this winter she convinced the harbor master to install a platform on the breakwater in hopes that osprey would nest there. They did! Osprey have been continuing to be present in increasing numbers here in the Bay Area, and I was able to get to see the nest last week, just a week after the two babies hatched. It was difficult to see them because they are still so small, but I hope to return to see them in a couple of weeks when they are more visible.

Right when I got there, dad (named Lee) had just caught a nice sized striped bass and was looking for a place to start eating. The fish looks like it is saying “oooooooohhhhhhh shit.” Valid.

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My friend said that he typically has been the one hunting, and the female sits on the nest with the young since they hatched. Evidently he seems to always get this size and type of fish, and there were reports about a year ago of a surge in the density of striped bass in the Bay. He usually finds a spot to eat the head, before he delivers it to the nest. Today though, he left a nearby perch possibly due to the high winds and he went right over the nest. But not before the gulls harrassed him for his dinner.

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The gulls are always looking for an easy meal, and two great-blue herons that were on the breakwater were not pleased …

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A double-crested cormorant popped up right by us on the dock, beautiful creatures.

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Pops decided to re-locate after mom (Eileen) had fed herself and the tiny little hatchlings. He went on a perch just to the side of the nest to keep working on dinner, as the sky turned to pink and purple with the setting sun.

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Special thanks to Shirley for all the work she does and her love for these birds.

 

 

 

 

 


20150913 salmon creek wander

Beautiful day out by Salmon Creek in Sonoma County – a bit of sun before the marine layer rolled in thick like a fluffy down comforter over the beaches and dunes. Lots of red and gray fox track and sign, even more striped skunk track and sign. Almost no new rabbit sign. I’m beginning to think that perhaps the area is like an animal beach-condo timeshare – evidently the skunks have it this time of year and the rabbits are vacationing elsewhere.

This red-tailed hawk has some really interesting plumage, it reminds me of a bird I saw once in the high desert in Washington. You can see there is tan mixed in with the brown and white on the back, and its head and especially neck feathers are really light. Beautiful bird, very striking.

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This osprey and I were able to see eye-to-eye today on composing this photo. Much appreciated! Their eyes are HUGE compared to the rest of their head.

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We watched a coyote hunting from across the creek for quite some time, it seemed to be stalking through the high grass, occasionally stopping to dig or pounce. Sometimes it would get really excited and stand with its ears facing the ground, while its tail whirled around like a helicopter blade behind it! It made a short trip to the waters edge, but all the water fowl were already tuned-in to its presence. A doe and two fawns watched it with interest from within 50 feet – the coyote didn’t even give them a look. Rodents and insects seemed to be on the menu today. So fun to watch this guy hunt!

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The pounce!

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We had quite a few nice red fox trails to study today, this is a good example of a classic red fox track (front foot on the bottom). The diagnostic “bar” in the metacarpal pad of the front foot is very evident in this track – it’s not always clear, but if it is it can be one helpful sign (of many) to differentiate red fox tracks from coyote tracks.

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I didn’t get a picture, but we observed what we believed to be two or three pomarine jaegers (a type of flying sea bird) offshore attacking some elegant terns out at an area where many birds were feeding. It was my first sighting of this species, and evidently it’s uncommon to see them from shore (usually they are seen from boats further out to sea). There were quite a few dead murres along the beach, these are also ocean-going birds, but curiously they come onshore almost exclusively to die. Often people see these birds on the beach and try to save them, not realizing that they are already doomed. Many a kind-hearted person has been confused and heart-broken trying to help these birds. I photographed one last year down towards Moss Landing near Monterey. They look a bit like penguins when they are sitting or moving out of the water.

Down on the beach there was a large flock of marbled godwits feeding in the surf line, using their long beaks to probe in the sand for crustaceans – occasionally they would flush and fly down the beach all together.

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Great day out on the coast, very thankful to live close by to such natural beauty.


fledge week!

During this past two weeks I’ve had the fortune to see a lot of local raptor young and fledglings – peregrine falcons, red-tailed hawks, northern harriers, white-tailed kites, osprey, and even one black hawk / red-shoulder hybrid. I’ll have more detailed blog posts and the stories about each of these soon, but for now here are a few pictures.

white-tailed kite fledgling

white-tailed kite fledgling / Marin County CA

red-tailed hawk fledgling

red-tailed hawk fledgling / Wildcat Canyon Reg Park Contra Costa County CA

northern harrier baby

northern harrier chick / Marin County CA

blackhawk / red-shoulder hawk hybrid baby

blackhawk / red-shoulder hawk hybrid chick / Sonoma County CA

osprey with 3 chicks

osprey with 3 chicks / Mare Island Contra Costa County CA

juvenile peregrine falcon / Sonoma Coast, CA

juvenile peregrine falcon / Sonoma Coast, CA

 

 

 


another abbott’s adventure … sand stories

i don’t have a lot of words right now. one morning at a place like this is the same as reading 1000 books, combined with touching 1000 textures, smelling 1000 smells, hearing 1000 sounds, tasting 1000 flavors, seeing 1000 treasures and feeling a 1000000 heart strings of life.

we were treated at the beginning of the morning just after sunrise to the five resident Otters foraging in the lagoon, and a visitor that I have never seen before in this immediate area … a golden Eagle!

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the above picture was of a creature foreshadowing things to come – this red-legged Frog (?) was a precursor to SO many Frog tracks in the sand, along with many deer Mice and brush Rabbit tracks – appearing in the middle of bare sand dunes for reasons unexplained. I surmise the new moon allowed some expanded forays for these normally reclusive species who stick to the cover of the plants on the edges of the dunes during most times.

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brush Rabbit tracks

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Frog tracks (likely red-legged Frog)

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river Otter scent marking on the dunes

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Bobcat (on right) and some type of amphibian (Salamander) tracks on left – perhaps an Ensinitas?

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deer Mouse tracks with tail drag

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beautiful clear front tracks of a red-legged Frog (right) along with deer Mouse tracks on the left

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great-horned Owl tracks leading into a take-off spot

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great-horned Owl trail …

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WOW! what a find!!!! the trail seen in the picture from the left is a great-horned Owl coming in for a landing (final landing spot seen in the center of the picture). you can see it’s wing and tail feather imprints in the sand. also you can see a Raccoon trail diagonally across the picture from lower right to left (occurring after the Owl), along with faint Frog tracks paralleling the Raccoon, and some two-legged tracks at the top.

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another view of the great-horned Owl landing spot (along with feather marks in sand!!), and its trail leading away from the landing point – ultimately to a take-off spot around 10 yards away. again, you can see the Raccoon trail across the center, and many other tracks in the background.

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great-horned Owl tracks

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a beautiful black-tailed mule Deer trail

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Sanderling trail (?)  … though I’m open to other interpretations … and some faint deer Mice, Frog and insect trails – this was found in the lagoon sand dunes, far from the surf

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more Sanderling (?) tracks

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another (!) great-horned Owl trail in the sand dunes!

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one of my favorites to see live (but seldom a dependable sight), there were plenty of north american river Otter tracks around

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the turkey Vultures are always hanging around for a meal, and this (faint) track (among smaller shore bird tracks) showed that they are quick to come in on the remains of shore birds who are predated at the lagoon by a varied cast of opportunists …

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Bobcat tracks in sediment / algae

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Bobcat trail in sediment / algae

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Bobcat tracks (nice shot of front and rear) – based on the size and the shape, we decided it was likely a male

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likely a Bobcat scat – it contained almost purely feathers!

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Osprey – one of the NINE raptor species that we were treated to seeing on this day (Osprey, northern Harrier, white-tailed Kite, Kestrel, peregrine Falcon, turkey Vulture, Red-tailed hawk, Ferruginous hawk, and golden Eagle!). My friends also saw a Cooper’s hawk as they were driving out.

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Red-tailed hawk on dunes

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these snowy Plovers, a highly endangered species, were using human tracks in the sand as wind breaks from the increasing gusts coming in from the ocean – it was pretty adorable

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this peregrine Falcon was not welcome company for the Kestrel who was attempting to escort it out of the area

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the “mud hen,” or Coot – top of the menu for many predators at this time of year here. when the Otters come by, they move to the shore and band together, waiting for them to pass

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for reasons still not understood (by me), the Ravens were harassing the Red-tailed hawks as usual. perhaps it is for fun or to prove social status … fun, being something that the Ravens seem to incorporate into their lives all the time, evidenced by their frolicking in the air lifts caused by the oncoming winds into the dunes. seeing them play in the air is like watching Otters in the water, the energy is simply fun!

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lots of black-tailed mule Deer around in the fields, where we also saw lots of Badger sign

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Coyote tracks

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a cool shot of some black-tailed mule Deer tracks in the sand (with some two different bird tracks on the right of the frame)

the only animal signs that I might have expected to see and didn’t on this day were the grey fox and jack rabbit. grey Fox sign isn’t often seen right in this area, but jack Rabbit is. curious.

what a great day out at Point Reyes National Seashore, this place is such a gift – may it be protected for all this diversity of life to thrive, always.

zd


a morning of birds on the russian river

killdeer / Russian River Sonoma County CA

killdeer / Russian River Sonoma County CA

killdeer / Russian River Sonoma County CA

killdeer / Russian River Sonoma County CA

killdeer / Russian River Sonoma County CA

killdeer / Russian River Sonoma County CA

Want to get better at shooting birds in flight? Try practicing on tree swallows flying over a river catching insects … in poor light. Everything else becomes much easier, let me tell you! Just to remain standing and not spun around and on my face in the sand or river was a minor success.

tree swallow / Russian River Sonoma County CA

tree swallow / Russian River Sonoma County CA

tree swallow / Russian River Sonoma County CA

tree swallow / Russian River Sonoma County CA

The osprey were out and about as well, with two or three pairs fishing and perched in the area. There are many nests around the river and out towards the coast in Sonoma County, always amazing to see these birds in action. They seemed as interested in me as I was in them …

osprey / Russian River Sonoma County CA

osprey / Russian River Sonoma County CA

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Watching it all unfold was a tree full of vultures, trying to warm up on a chilly and foggy West County morning on the river.

vulture roost / Russian River Sonoma County CA

vulture roost / Russian River Sonoma County CA

turkey vulture / Russian River Sonoma County CA

turkey vulture / Russian River Sonoma County CA


Albany mudflats opsrey – a Canon lens comparison

I was spoiled the other day while observing peregrine falcons (besides the fact that I was observing peregrine falcons!) – a fellow East Bay photographer, George Suennen, let me borrow his “more advanced” (aka more expensive) lens setup for a couple of shots (Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM Telephoto Lens with a 2x teleconverter). I REALLY REALLY don’t want to like this piece of equipment, but … WOW. Very gracious of him to offer for me to use it, I’m not sure if I thank him or curse him for putting that thing in my hands!!

oprey / Albany mudflats CA

oprey / Albany mudflats CA

Right now I typically shoot with a different Canon 300mm lens – the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM (but I DON’T have a 2x teleconverter attached – which brings the L-series lens setup to an equivalent of 600mm!). To understand the difference in lenses, a visual comparison is in order of course. Both images below are cropped close to 100% but no other post-processing has been applied (sharpening, contrast/brightness adjustment, etc). The same camera body was used. The difference between the lens setups is very evident.

Canon 70-300mm zoom lens

Canon 70-300mm zoom lens

Canon L-series 300mm fixed lens w/ 2x teleconverter

Canon L-series 300mm fixed lens w/ 2x teleconverter

Are the results worth 14x the amount of money more? I suppose that’s an individual choice. It’s certainly understandable why this lens is rated one of the best in the Canon lineup, and a standard for many sports and wildlife photographers. Until I make the jump, I’ll have to continue to get close to subjects without disturbing them to get clear shots … which is a large part of the fun – and helps to force me to really get the most out of my equipment and techniques.


osprey moon twilight

osprey nest and moon

osprey nest and moon